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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

FDA Poisonous Plant Database

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AUTHOR(S): Anonymous
TITLE: Reducing livestock losses from lupine poisoning in the western states.
YEAR: 1958 CITATION: U S Dep Agric Pamphlet, PA-325(), 3 pp [English]
FDA #: F05010
ABSTRACT: Article: Many species of lupines grow on grazing lands in the United States. Not all of them are poisonous to livestock. The following table lists the most poisonous species of lupines. common name/botanical Name/Distribution Silky lupine/Lupinus sericeus/MT, SD, WY, ID, OR, WA Velvet lupine/L. leucophyllus/OR, ID, UT, WY Silvery lupine/L. argenteus/ND, Wy, CO, NM, AR, UT, ID Tailcup lupine/L. caudatus/OR, NV, CA, ID, UT, WY Perennial lupine/L. perennis/ME to MN south to FL & LA Sheep are poisoned by feeding on lupines; other animals are seldom poisoned. Losses may be especially heavy when hungry animals are trailed through lupine ranges in the late summer. Sheep are occasionally poisoned by eating plants that have been cut and dried. Poisonous lupines are dangerous from the time they start growth in the spring until they dry up in the fall. Most of them are especially dangerous in the late summer, when the pods form. The pods and seeds may retain their poisonous properties after the plants have matured. The toxic substances in lupines are alkaloids. Where and When it Grows: These plants grow on desert and mountain ranges, on sagebrush and aspen areas, and on foothills. The five species listed above are perennials (some lupines are annuals); they usually start growth fairy early in the spring, flower in June, and form seeds in July and August. How It Affects Livestock: The amount of lupine necessary to kill an animal varies with the plant species. An animal may eat comparatively large quantities of the plant without injury, if it does not eat a toxic dose at any one time. The following are symptoms of lupine poisoning: 1. Nervousness, 2. Reluctance to follow the band, 3. Difficulty in breathing, 4. Frothing at the mouth, 5. Convulsions, 6. Coma. How to Reduce Livestock Losses: Sheep will seldom eat a toxic dose of lupine if satisfactory forage is available. Losses can be reduced by keeping hungry animals away from lupine patches in the late summer, when the plant is highly toxic, and from dense plant stands at all times. Supplemental feeding is beneficial, especially when trailing animals through lupine ranges. There is no effective treatment for lupine poisoning, and eradication of the plant is practicable only in small isolated areas. Good results can be obtained by spraying the plants with a herbicide, such as 2,4-D or 1,4,5-T. To be effective, the treatment must be continued for 2 or 3 years, or until eradication s completed.
GRIN #: 22809 Exit Disclaimer
COMMON NAME
STANDARD COMMON NAME
FAMILYFabaceae
LATIN NAMELupinus argenteus
STANDARD PLANT NAMELupinus argenteus Pursh
GRIN #: 403052 Exit Disclaimer
COMMON NAME
STANDARD COMMON NAME
FAMILYFabaceae
LATIN NAMELupinus caudatus
STANDARD PLANT NAMELupinus argenteus Pursh var. heteranthus (S. Watson) Barneby
GRIN #: 22833 Exit Disclaimer
COMMON NAME
STANDARD COMMON NAME
FAMILYFabaceae
LATIN NAMELupinus leucophyllus
STANDARD PLANT NAMELupinus leucophyllus Douglas ex Lindl.
GRIN #: 22852 Exit Disclaimer
COMMON NAME
STANDARD COMMON NAME
FAMILYFabaceae
LATIN NAMELupinus perennis
STANDARD PLANT NAMELupinus perennis L.
GRIN #: 22905 Exit Disclaimer
COMMON NAME
STANDARD COMMON NAME
FAMILYFabaceae
LATIN NAMELupinus sericeus
STANDARD PLANT NAMELupinus sericeus Pursh
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